Action Labs Tuesday and Wednesday (No Extra Fee)


Download Description and Details on Action Labs Tuesday and Wednesday  PDF  | DOC
Choose Action Labs for Tuesday and Wednesday when registering.

Action Labs Tuesday October 25 and Wednesday October 26

Tuesday, October 25 ACTION LABS

 

Other than fishing licenses as noted, your conference registration covers the cost for Tuesday-Wednesday Action Labs.

Transportation is provided as needed, and the time slots include transportation time. Choose Action Labs for Tuesday and Wednesday when registering.



Bridging the Watershed

 

Time

1:30 pm to 6 pm

Location

Harpers Ferry National Historical Park

Maximum

25 participants

Travel Time

70 minutes round trip

 

Visit the confluence of the Potomac and Shenandoah rivers as you talk with a National Park Ranger about the Park’s environmental science programs for schools. Next, participate in a hands-on module from the Bridging the Watershed program for high school science teachers—a partnership program with the Alice Ferguson Foundation. Working with the Water Canaries module, capture benthic macroinvertebrates in the Shenandoah River and analyze results to assess water quality. Before you leave, hike to better view the area's natural resources. For more information, see

http://www.nps.gov/hafe/index.htm and http://fergusonfoundation.org/bridging-the-watershed/).

 


Hooked on Science—Cutting Edge Aquaculture Research and Technology

 

Time

1:30 pm to 5:30 pm

Location

USGS Leetown Science Center and The Freshwater Institute

Maximum

20 participants

Travel Time

45 minutes altogether

 

Visit the oldest federal fishery research facility, the Leetown Science Center. The Center applies expertise in a broad diversity of scientific disciplines to conduct research programs addressing high priority needs of natural resource managers and policy makers. Tour the facility, interacting with scientists. See a fish necropsy demonstration used in wild fish health assessments. Scientists will obtain a blood sample, show the various organs, and discuss pieces used for histopathology, gene expression, and other analyses. See the otoliths (ear bones) and how they are used for aging a fish. Before leaving, you’ll learn more about the science that informs wise stewardship of natural resources. More at http://www.lsc.usgs.gov.

 

The second stop is at one of the nation’s premiere research and development facilities for sustainable water use and reuse, The Freshwater Institute, an internationally recognized program of The Conservation Fund. From their campus in Shepherdstown, the Institute combines applied research, engineering, and economic development skills to show how freshwater resources achieve economic and environmental goals. Visit with scientists to learn how they integrate engineering, biology, and conservation for such work as aquaculture, endangered species restoration, water conservation, habitat restoration, and water reclamation. Core design work focuses on fish hatcheries and aquaponics, aquatic species mitigation, and restoration. For more, see

http://www.conservationfund.org/our-conservation-strategy/major-programs/freshwater-institute/

 




Explore Bowfishing

 

Time

1:30 pm to 5:30 pm

Location

NCTC Gymnasium

Maximum

40 participants

 

Want to get kids fishing in a brand new way? Tap into their world of instant gratification by hooking them with bowfishing. Experience this innovative tool kit that gets kids outside and excited to spend time on the water. Explore Bowfishing is an interactive shooting program that teaches the basics of bowfishing and introduces participants to a fast-paced, archery-based form of fishing. Explore Bowfishing is for students both new to fishing or archery and for well-seasoned anglers and archers. Join us for some fun and learn the basics of bowfishing.

 



Healthy Rivers = Healthy Fishing, Glade Creek Tree Planting

 

Time

1:30 pm to 6 pm

Location

Walkersville, Maryland

Maximum

12 participants (plus one for Stream-Link)

Travel Time

2 hours altogether

 

This action lab takes you on a multi-site tour of riparian areas where you’ll see several land features that impact water quality. Then it’s on to participate in a tree planting along Glade Creek at a farm that removed the cows from the stream area. Stream-Link Education founder and 2013 Forest Champion award winner (Most Effective on the Ground Impact) will lead this trip. During the drive, discuss how local attitudes have impacted the improvement of water quality for Glade Creek, on the 303d list for impaired waterways, and how the this organization has made inroads with school and community-based landowners to plant riparian zones on their property with the help of local volunteers. For more information, see http://www.streamlinkeducation.org/.

 




Wednesday, October 26 ACTION LABS


Tips and Tricks for a Successful Fly Fishing Program     !! CLOSED - NO SLOTS LEFT !!

 

Time

1 pm to 5:30 pm

Location

Poor House Farm, Martinsburg, West Virginia

Maximum

24 participants (plus instructors)

Lunch

Pre-order NCTC bag lunch

Fishing License

Purchase a West Virginia fishing license (https://www.wvfish.com)

Fishing Gear

Gear will be provided, and you may bring your own.

Travel Time

70 minutes round trip

 

Learn how to structure an effective fly fishing program for any age group from some of AREA’s top fly fishing trainers. No Fly Fishing experience required. Find out the tips and tricks of conducing a fly fishing clinic for a “one-time” 10-minute introduction, the 1-hour, 3-hour or 3-week program. Learn the basics of fly fishing for freshwater and saltwater, small or big water, still or moving water. Topics will include equipment options and pre-registered versus open/walk-in activities; how to use volunteers or hire contractors. Discover how to work with schools, fly fishing shops, scouts, camp programs, life-long learners, college programs, parks and recreation partners, and more. Examine curricula from the National Fishing in Schools Program, the Boy Scouts merit badge, and other states' fly fishing programs.

 

Pre-order a bag lunch when you choose this lab.  Bring your lunch with you for this action lab. Lunch is included for overnight guests; commuters will need to pay for their lunch onsite.

 




Using Public Parks for Watershed Education   

 

Time

1:30 pm to 5:30 pm

Location

Flowing Springs Park and Wildwood Middle School, Charles Town and Shenandoah Junction, WV

Maximum

20 participants

Travel Time

45 minutes altogether

 

Visit Flowing Springs Park where students learn outdoors about their watershed. See how Potomac Valley Audubon Society engages 4th graders through multiple visits including time for instructors to explore watershed issues with students. Students search for macroinvertebrates, test water quality, and assess stream banks as part of this award-winning program. Then talk with a Presidential Innovation Award for Environmental Education teacher about how she uses the park’s spring-fed stream to support STEM and other project-based curricula. Learn how she deepens the impact of “Trout in the Classroom” as students study the requirements of brook trout and evaluate stream conditions for suitability of brook trout reintroduction. Visit the trout tank in the classroom on the way back to NCTC.

 




FULL!    Mysterious and Perilous Journeys of the American Eel and Freshwater Mussel Larvae

 

Time

1:30 pm to 5:30 pm

Location

Millville, West Virginia

Maximum

19 participants

Travel Time

75 minutes altogether

 

Great journeys make great tales of mystery, peril, and triumph. The catadromous American Eel has a complex life history involving larval, glass, elver, yellow, and silver phases. Catadromous fishes spawn in the ocean but live most of their lives in freshwater. During the yellow phase, many migrate long distances upstream toward river headwaters, but dams interfere with upstream migration. Fortunately, fish passage facilities on dams can aid upstream migration. Over 21,000 American Eels have used the Millville eel ladder since it was installed on the lower Shenandoah River in 2003. American Eels are also a good host for native freshwater mussel larvae, which need a host fish to complete their reproductive cycle. Freshwater mussels filter streams and rivers, providing habitat for macroinvetebrates. Visit the eel ladder, learn how freshwater mussels hitch a ride with eels, and get your feet wet learning about freshwater mussel habitat and life history.

 



Goggles, Scopes, and Scalpels, Oh My!

 

Time

1:30 pm to 5:30 pm

Location

NCTC Science Laboratories

Maximum

36 participants

 

Grab a lab coat and goggles and join NCTC staff in their modern science lab facilities that literally link lab with field, stream, and river. Step into the flow with three hour-long hands-on rotations where you’ll study macroinvertebrates, dissect fish, and learn how to identify fish. The NCTC Science Laboratories are designed to provide natural resource professionals with advanced, hands-on training in fisheries and wildlife resources, as well as water and land management techniques.

The overall theme of the laboratory sessions is to consider how aquatic health is assessed using fish and macroinvertebrates through good identification skills.

 




Download Details on Action Labs Tuesday and Wednesday  PDF  | DOC

Choose Action Labs for Tuesday and Wednesday when registering.




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